Writing with Sharon Watson-Easy-to-use Homeschool Writing and Literature Curriculum

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6 Literature-Based Writing Prompts

6 Literature-Based Writing Prompts

SHARON’S BLOG
Literature holds an Aladdin’s cave of treasures that students can plunge their pens into.

Whether it’s imitating good writing, pondering a topic in the story, or using the story to write another, your students will gain a healthy curiosity for great works of literature as they write.

To enjoy these fun prompts, knowledge of the following stories is not necessary.

Terms covered: epiphany, spatial description, and paraphrase.

These literature-based prompts are suitable for your 5th – 12th graders.

Ready to go treasure hunting?

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How to Develop an Almost Painless Reading List for Teens and Tweens

How to Develop an Almost Painless Reading List for Teens and Tweens

SHARON’S BLOG

 Do you hear that thunder? It’s the crash of schoolbooks all over the country slamming shut for the summer.

As a parent, you want your children to continue using their reading skills. You know there are so many wonderful books they would enjoy reading now that it is summer and the distractions are fewer. Treasures await them. Do you have a plan to make it happen?

If not, you can use mine.

A summer reading list is more fun for your tweens and teens if it’s

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National Reading Month: 10 Must-Read Classics for High School

National Reading Month: 10 Must-Read Classics for High School

SHARON’S BLOG

I’ve had a long and strange relationship with the classics.

In 8th grade, our English class read Nathaniel Hawthorne’s The Scarlet Letter, but I could never figure out what the red “A” stood for.

As an Christian adult, I developed the inexplicable idea that reading fiction was a waste of time. I should read only religious or self-help books . . . until I became so ill that I was bored out of my skull for one month lying on the couch. I turned to the only fiction book in our tiny trailer: a complete collection of Sherlock Holmes stories, which seemed appropriate for someone with the last name of Watson.

I was hooked, and I never looked back.

(Well, there was that one time when I resisted reading George Eliot’s Silas Marner because I mistook “Marner” for “Mariner,” and I have a dislike for sea-going stories but then read it and it became one of my FAVORITES! But that is another story.)

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Punctuation in Dialog

Punctuation in Dialog

SHARON’S BLOG

punctuation in dialogWelcome to the third in a series of grammar tutorials! You can find the first one on commas in compound sentences here. The second one teaches the position of commas, periods, colons, and semicolons when used with quotation marks. What could be more exciting?!

Now . . . on to today’s tutorial.

Do you have students who love to hide in their bedrooms and write story after story?

Most likely, they are hoping to be published one day, their stories read and loved by millions, their names on the covers of sought-after books.

One thing editors look for in a new writer is proficiency in grammar and punctuation. Granted, it’s not a huge thing; it’s more important to know how to write a great story. But grammar is an indicator of how well the writer knows the language and its conventions, and it is something that editors take into account when determining whom to publish.

Let’s make sure our students have access to the skills they need to get published.

A tiff between Tarzan and Jane in this fun tutorial will guide your students through the punctuation-in-dialog jungle.

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2 Fresh Summertime Ideas for Writing and Literature

2 Fresh Summertime Ideas for Writing and Literature

SHARON’S BLOG

Happy summertime hello to you!

Since we’re deep into vacations, cook-outs, swimming, gardening, swatting mosquitoes, and avoiding school, I wanted to keep this blog light and share some fun stuff that doesn’t take a lot of energy.

Today’s blog is a combo deal: two blogs for one low, low price!

1. Want some fun writing activities for your kids this summer?

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Empathetic Characters: The Author Molds Your Child’s Heart

Empathetic Characters: The Author Molds Your Child’s Heart

SHARON’S BLOG

I recently witnessed this stomach-churning conversation between a teen and his mother:

.
“The main character divorced his wife and married another woman,” the teen announced after he read his book.
“That’s not good,” his mother said.
“But he had to, Mom. His wife was really awful! She treated him really badly.”

The son went on to tell his mother some of the hateful things the wife had done to her husband in order to explain why this man was justified in divorcing his wife. Anyone would agree that they were truly rotten things.
The exasperated mother calmly stated, “God hates divorce.”

Her son did not change his mind. “But he had to divorce her.”
..

.My friend was scrambling to figure out how her son could have viewed this divorce in a positive light.

.What had happened to make her intelligent son fall prey to a viewpoint unacceptable to his parents?

This blog is not about divorce. It’s about two methods authors use to influence our children’s minds and hearts.

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3 Myths about Literature that Will Ruin Your Class

3 Myths about Literature that Will Ruin Your Class

SHARON’S BLOG

Choosing a literature program for your teens isn’t the easiest thing in the world, and neither are actually having the class and getting teens to read the books. Making these tasks even harder, I’ve found, is that homeschool moms and co-op teachers often have some ideas about literature that sabotage all of their good efforts.

Read on to see if you have avoided believing these three myths about homeschool literature. And before I forget, check out the link at the end of this article for your FREE downloads from our literature courses When Worlds Collide or Characters in Crisis!

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Literature: Why Your Teens Won’t Read it and What You Can Do about It


SHARON’S BLOG

literature Literature might seem like one of those courses in which pulling teeth is involved.

You assign a poem, play, short story, or novel to read, and you immediately encounter resistance. It’s hard, they say. It’s boring, they complain. The lawyer in them tries to make a deal with you: “I’ll read these more exciting young adult novels, and you can count that as literature. At least I’m reading.”

What can you do?

Before I forget, check out the FREE downloads of the first two chapters of our new literature course coming out this summer! Get the info at the end of this article!

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