Writing with Sharon Watson-Easy-to-use Homeschool Writing and Literature Curriculum

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Compare and Contrast: 2 Solid Methods

Compare and Contrast: 2 Solid Methods

SHARON’S BLOG

Compare and Contrast: 2 Solid Methods

Have your students ever been asked to write a compare-and-contrast paragraph or essay but don’t know where to begin? Do they have trouble organizing their thoughts and information before comparing and contrasting?

Your 5th – 12th graders will learn two solid methods for compare-and-contrast writing with this free tutorial. It’s packed with two separate exercises, one for each method,  and contains  complete instructions and colorful worksheets. Your students will learn how to organize their thoughts before writing with either method, and then they’ll write two paragraphs using each method.

Students already know how to compare and contrast in real life: They do it every time they want to buy something and are torn between two choices. They go through the process mentally, and it’s likely automatic and subconscious.

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Word Choices Bundle: Attention to Detail

Word Choices Bundle: Attention to Detail

SHARON’S BLOG

Do you “have a plan” or have you “hatched a scheme”? Are your students writing about the “circulation” of the blood or about how the blood “circulates”?

Do they understand how to use specific adjectives? Do they know the power of connotations? Do they turn sluggish nouns into working verbs? Do they define their terms?

Enjoy these nine tutorials that teach all of these things and much more. They will instruct your students in the finer art of using the elegant English language. Now students are not just writing; they are communicating.

Appropriate for 7th-12th graders. Use the lessons now or bookmark them for future use.

It’s time to dive into the splashy end of the pool . . .

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Tutorials for Specific Types of Essays

Tutorials for Specific Types of Essays

SHARON’S BLOG

Persuasion. How-to. Compare and contrast. Enumerative. Are your students baffled by these types of essays?

Take heart! Use the 13 links you’ll find below that show how to format and write 6 types of paragraphs and essays.

As an added bonus, the last link leads to a very handy writing schedule you can use all year. Never say, “Write an essay,” again! (You’ve got to be kidding!)

These tutorials are appropriate for students in 7th – 12th grade. Use them now or bookmark them for future use.

{Writing Tip: If your student is not quite ready to write a whole essay, give him or her practice in writing the types of paragraphs you’ll find in this post. For instance, instead of writing a whole compare-and-contrast essay, how about a compare-and-contrast paragraph from one of the links in #5?}

Ready? Let’s go . . .

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Equip Your Students with These 11 Essential Writing Tools

Equip Your Students with These 11 Essential Writing Tools

SHARON’S BLOG

Could your students use some writing tools?

Your students have to come up with a paragraph or an essay, but they do not know where to begin. They do not know where to get ideas, how to formulate a plan, how to narrow down their topic, how to organize their ideas, how to write a credible paragraph, and so on.

Does this sound familiar?

Then you’ve come to the right place! Use the links below to equip your students with the writing tools they need to be successful this year. Many of these links contain tutorials and free worksheets to download. I hope you like #s 10 and 11. Thousands of moms and teachers have already downloaded them and found happiness.

Ready? Let’s go . . .

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Why Teach Writing?

Why Teach Writing?

SHARON’S BLOG

Why teach writing? After all, it’s tough. It’s confusing. And sometimes crying is involved.

If your writing class is flagging and your zeal is dragging, consider this post as a friendly smile I am sending your way.

 

So, what are some of the benefits of teaching our kids to write? Here goes . . .

1. Students become more organized in their thinking when they learn to write. Writing clearly involves organizational skills that will aid our students in other subjects.

2. Writing causes students to think through topics or defend a position. Through this process, students gain an understanding of

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3 Ideas to Help Your Writers, and Only 2 of Them Are Crazy

3 Ideas to Help Your Writers, and Only 2 of Them Are Crazy

SHARON’S BLOG

I understand at the outset of this article that the word “them” in my title is ambiguous. Does it stand for the writers or for the ideas?

As you can see, writing is hard. At least, that’s what students tell me.

It makes their hands hurt. They don’t know where to begin. They don’t know how to construct paragraphs. If they’re not interested in the topic, they can’t think of anything to write anyway.

The list goes on and on and is pretty much the same in all the classes I teach.

A number of moms confess to me that they’ve given up teaching writing. Some say that whenever they give their students writing assignments, crying is involved. (I assume it’s the students doing the crying, but I could possibly be wrong about that.)

Even in the weekly writing class I teach for high school homeschoolers, at least two students have

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How to Overcome a Reluctant Writer’s Resistance

How to Overcome a Reluctant Writer’s Resistance

SHARON’S BLOG

Are you encountering resistance when you ask your students to write?

Is there crying involved?

It’s intimidating for students to stare down a blank piece of paper or a computer screen. Middle and high school students have revealed to me why they are negative about writing. Here’s what they have to say:

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One Sure-Fire Way to Create Writing Prompts for Your Students

One Sure-Fire Way to Create Writing Prompts for Your Students

SHARON’S BLOG

I have a secret to tell you.

I’m not really sure I should. After all, it feels a little like a chef revealing the secret ingredient to a closely guarded family recipe, but I’m going to share it with you anyway.

As you may know, I create many writing prompts, usually two a week for my Website and the daily writing prompts for SchoolhouseTeachers.com. That’s a lot of writing and a lot of prompts.

Where do I get my ideas? Here’s my secret:

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The SAT Essay: What You Need to Know About It


SHARON’S BLOG

SAT essayThe words “SAT essay” can strike fear in the hearts of moms and teens. It seems like a vast, blackened storm at sea, and students can feel a little seasick about taking the test.

Consider this a virtual dose of non-drowsy Dramamine ®.

You’ll want to know two things right away:

1. The January 2016 SAT essay was a persuasive essay, but it exists no more.
2. Beginning in March 2016, the SAT essay will be analytical, which I will also address below.

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