Writing with Sharon Watson-Easy-to-use Homeschool Writing and Literature Curriculum

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Proofreading Tutorials Bundle

Proofreading Tutorials Bundle

SHARON’S BLOG

Would you like your students to understand how to use proofreading marks? Do they know that they do not have to proofread for everything at once?

And did you know that it is easier for students to proofread if they practice on someone else’s mistakes?

Explore the posts below, appropriate for 7th – 12th graders. Click on any post’s image or link below to get started. FREE tutorials and printables included.

What will your students learn today?

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Grammar Tutorials Bundle

Grammar Tutorials Bundle

SHARON’S BLOG

Looking for a fun way to teach grammar concepts to your 7th – 12th grade students?

This bundle of tutorials is geared to hold your students’ interest with colorful infographics and quirky sentences to work on. Each tutorial contains a lesson, an exercise, and the answers, all free for you to download and print at your leisure.

Commas with compound sentences, dialog punctuation, singular indefinite pronouns, and much more!

Use them now or bookmark them for future use.

Some of the tutorials below are featured in our eBook Let’s Eat Fifi. Read more about that 23-lesson grammar book here.

Click on the individual images or the links below for each tutorial. Let’s go . . .

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How to Convince an Audience: Opinion versus Persuasion

How to Convince an Audience: Opinion versus Persuasion

SHARON’S BLOG

Our students are very good at expressing their opinions, especially when they want to change our minds!

What they don’t understand is that if they truly want to change someone’s mind, they have to stop thinking about themselves and start thinking about their audience.

This tutorial, with a free infographic to download, will show your students very clearly the difference between writing an opinion and writing to persuade an audience.

Opinion versus Persuasion

Writing or expressing an opinion is all about what your student likes; convincing a parent or friend to do something is all about what the parent or friend needs to hear to be persuaded.

Here’s an infographic to teach your students the difference between writing an opinion and writing to persuade. After the infographic, I’ve included a short writing exercise your students can do quickly. My writing class just did it, and they had fun sharing their ideas about alligators, snow leopards, snakes, and so forth. I enjoyed watching those invisible lights turn on over their heads!

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Proofreading Marks and How to Use Them

Proofreading Marks and How to Use Them

SHARON’S BLOG

This tutorial shows your students the universal proofreading marks and how to use them. Plus, you'll get examples and an exercise to reinforce the information.Do your students waste endless time erasing whole sentences? Do they become discouraged when they look at their rough drafts filled with arrows, illegible notes in the margins, and ugly lines of scratched-out writing? Let’s save them the pain by teaching them these handy, easy-to-use proofreading marks.

I’ve watched students in my writing classes scratch out whole sentences and rewrite them. They draw lines through words. They burn up their papers and crumble their erasers just to change something.

This is totally unnecessary.

There’s an easierand quickerway to proofread that doesn’t require a lot of rewriting, which should be good news to our students.

This is the last in a series of tutorials on grammar. In this one, you and your students will learn how to use these helpful proofreading marks.

If you’re dying to know what the other grammar tutorials are about, click here for one on punctuation in dialog. (Tarzan and Jane help out on that one.) Click here if you yearn to know how to handle commas in compound sentences with coordinating conjunctions.

And click here for the hard-hitting exposé on where to put the comma, period, colon, or semicolon when using quotation marks.  Here’s a tutorial on a question I suspect you’ve heard from your students about using question marks and exclamation points with end quotation marks (you know, do they go inside or outside?).

For the tutorial revealing the crazy fact that the word “everyone” is singular, click here. And to finally put to rest your students’ confusion about it’s/its, you’re/your, and others of that ilk, click here.

 

 

Proofreading Marks

As with all the other tutorials, you get a super-duper package today: an infographic to teach the proofreading marks, an example of how to use them in a real paragraph, a exercise so students can fix someone else’s mistakes, and the answers.

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Apostrophe or no Apostrophe: It’s Confusing

Apostrophe or no Apostrophe: It’s Confusing

SHARON’S BLOG

confusingThis week’s grammar tutorial puts to rest some confusing words like “it’s” and “its.”

You can use the infographic below to teach your students about some confusing word usage. After that, there’s an exercise to reinforce the material with your students, and you’ll find the answers below the exercise.

Now, on to the tutorial . . .

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It’s True: “Everyone” Is Singular!

It’s True: “Everyone” Is Singular!

SHARON’S BLOG

everyone is singularIt is hard to believe, but the word “everyone” is singular.

It sounds as though it should include a lot of people; in fact, it should include everyone—and that sounds plural.

But “everyone” is in the list of singular indefinite pronouns, which are listed here: each, every, either, neither, no, one, no one, everyone, someone, anyone, nobody, everybody, somebody, anybody, nothing, everything, something, anything.

I grouped them by their endings: -one, -body, and -thing. You also could list most of them by their beginnings: no-, every-, some-, and any-.

This week’s blog, which is another in a series of grammar tutorials, includes an infographic to teach the material, an exercise for your students, and answers to the exercise.

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Too Many Question Marks and Exclamation Points?

Too Many Question Marks and Exclamation Points?

SHARON’S BLOG

question marks and exclamation pointsWelcome to yet another week of biting, incisive grammar questions like this one: “Mom, is this sentence supposed to have one question mark or two at the end?”

If you’re dying to know what the other grammar tutorials are about, click here for one on punctuation in dialog. (Tarzan and Jane help out on that one.) Click here if you yearn to know how to handle commas in compound sentences with coordinating conjunctions. And click here for the hard-hitting exposé on where to put the comma, period, colon, or semicolon when using quotation marks.

This week, your students will wrestle with the thorny problem of what to do if a sentence is a question (interrogative) but there’s already a question mark to the left of the end quotation mark.

Take a look at the infographic, which is the lesson.

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Punctuation in Dialog

Punctuation in Dialog

SHARON’S BLOG

punctuation in dialogWelcome to the third in a series of grammar tutorials! You can find the first one on commas in compound sentences here. The second one teaches the position of commas, periods, colons, and semicolons when used with quotation marks. What could be more exciting?!

Now . . . on to today’s tutorial.

Do you have students who love to hide in their bedrooms and write story after story?

Most likely, they are hoping to be published one day, their stories read and loved by millions, their names on the covers of sought-after books.

One thing editors look for in a new writer is proficiency in grammar and punctuation. Granted, it’s not a huge thing; it’s more important to know how to write a great story. But grammar is an indicator of how well the writer knows the language and its conventions, and it is something that editors take into account when determining whom to publish.

Let’s make sure our students have access to the skills they need to get published.

A tiff between Tarzan and Jane in this fun tutorial will guide your students through the punctuation-in-dialog jungle.

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Where to Put the Comma, Period, Colon, and Semicolon When Using Quotation Marks

Where to Put the Comma, Period, Colon, and Semicolon When Using Quotation Marks

SHARON’S BLOG

punctuation Welcome to the second in a series of tutorials on grammar!

This week’s lesson answers such thorny questions as this one: “Mom, does a period go before or after the last quotation mark?”

You can find the first in the series of grammar tutorials here; it’s all about compound sentences, coordinating conjunctions, and commas. And if that doesn’t create some excitement in the classroom, I don’t know what will.

This week’s tutorial includes an infographic to teach the material, a set of sentences your students can correct to reinforce the material, and the answers to the sentences. There are only two rules (can you believe it?), and they are easy (again, is it to be believed?).

This lesson does not cover quotation marks in dialog. Tarzan and I will hit that next week.

As you’ll notice by the infographic,

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