Writing with Sharon Watson-Easy-to-use Homeschool Writing and Literature Curriculum

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Explore Green on St. Patrick’s Day

Explore Green on St. Patrick’s Day

MIDDLE SCHOOL PROMPTS

We celebrate St. Patrick’s Day on March 17, the day the patron saint of Ireland died.

Many like to wear green on St. Patrick’s Day, but where did the tradition of wearing green come from?

Some say that leprechauns cannot see the color green; therefore, you are invisible to them and cannot be pinched.

Others say it is because green is worn in Ireland by Catholics and orange by Protestants. Or could it be that Ireland is called the Emerald Isle? Or that green is one of the three colors in the Irish flag?

Whatever the reason, we’re going to have some fun with the color green.

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Miracles

Miracles

MIDDLE SCHOOL PROMPTS

Mr. George McWhirter Fotheringay doesn’t believe in miracles.

At least, that’s what H. G. Wells tells us in his short story “The Man Who Could Work Miracles.” First published in 1898, it tells of a man who didn’t believe in miracles but ended up doing some anyway.

One day, Mr. Fotheringay argues his case in a local tavern. He defines a miracle as “something contrariwise to the course of nature done by the power of Will, something that couldn’t happen without being specially willed.”

While arguing against miracles, he ends up doing one.

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Adjectives and Your Cereal Box

Adjectives and Your Cereal Box

MIDDLE SCHOOL PROMPTS

Advertising is everywhere. TV commercials bombard you 18 minutes out of every hour, but they are not the only places companies try to sell their products. Think of billboards, huge pictures of food products stuck to restaurant windows, and even your lowly cereal box.

Yes, even after you’ve bought the cereal, you still get advertisements about it. Take a look at a cereal box and notice all the adjectives there to describe the cereal and tell you how great it is. Here’s a sentence from my Cinnamon Life® cereal:

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In-text Citations for Middle School Students

In-text Citations for Middle School Students

MIDDLE SCHOOL PROMPTS

You want to avoid plagiarism in your writing.

Plagiarism is using someone else’s quotation, facts, statement, idea, or story without giving them credit.

So, how do you let your readers know that you borrowed the quotation, fact, and so on?

You cite your source by using an in-text citation. This simply means you are giving credit to someone for their information.

An in-text citation comes in tremendously handy when you are writing an essay that does not include footnotes, a bibliography, or a works cited page.

This is a tutorial on how to easily create in-text citations. Robin Hood may be involved.

Here we go . . .

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The Hamburger Menu


MIDDLE SCHOOL PROMPTS

hamburgerMcDonald’s Big Mac. Burger King’s Whopper. Hardee’s Thickburger. Rally’s and Checker’s Big Buford.

Is your mouth watering yet?

Let’s celebrate hamburgers and cheeseburgers with a menu of writing prompt choices.

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Feeling Twitchy?


MIDDLE SCHOOL PROMPTS

twitchy image and Moby-DickIt was a common practice long ago that travelers in inns slept in the same bed, even if they didn’t know one another. This seems strange to us and, yes, a little creepy now.

Here is a passage from Moby-Dick by Herman Melville in which the narrator Ishmael is telling us about how he decided not to sleep in the same bed with a harpooneer because Ishmael didn’t know how dirty the guy’s clothes would be (“his linen or woolen”) or even if he could trust him:

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Trees: Be Specific When You Describe

Trees: Be Specific When You Describe

MIDDLE SCHOOL PROMPTS

Let’s talk about trees.

Something interesting just happened to you. Right now. This moment.

When you read “trees,” an image of a tree or trees popped into your head. What was it?

When you write to describe something, you want to be specific. You DON’T want to write like this:

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Two Secrets to Writing an Exciting Description

Two Secrets to Writing an Exciting Description

MIDDLE SCHOOL PROMPTS

Reading descriptions can be super boring; you probably skip them when you read older books, especially if they go on and on.

Today’s writers know how to capture your attention and keep the descriptions interesting. What are their secrets? We’ll explore two today.

First, they use their senses. Here’s a fascinating verse about Jesus that the apostle John writes in the beginning of his first letter:

“That which was from the beginning, which we have heard, which we have seen with our eyes, which we have looked at and our hands have touched—this we proclaim concerning the Word of life” (I John 1:1 NIV)

How many senses from the list below does he depend on to tell us that Jesus is real?

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