SHARON’S BLOG

confusingThis week’s grammar tutorial puts to rest some confusing words like “it’s” and “its.”

You can use the infographic below to teach your students about some confusing word usage. After that, there’s an exercise to reinforce the material with your students, and you’ll find the answers below the exercise.

Now, on to the tutorial . . .

Here’s the infographic for the lesson. Click here for a PDF version of the graphic.

Students easily mix up contractions and plural pronouns, but they won't after they read this infographic about a guppy. Plot Spoiler: It does not end well for the guppy.

Exercise for “Apostrophe or no Apostrophe: It’s Confusing”

Here’s the student exercise. Feel free to copy and paste it onto a document so your students will have room to circle their correct answers. Or download the PDF of this exercise here. >>

Directions: Circle the correct words in each sentence.

1.      It’s      Its      not a secret.

2.     It’s      Its     easy to fall off this cliff because     it’s      its      trail runs too close to the edge.

3.     You’re        Your        not really going to eat that, are you?

4.     You’re        Your         stomach will revolt if you ride the Tilt-O-Wheel after eating three chili dogs.

5.     You’re         Your        experience at the theme park will be better if         you’re         your         not sick on the rides.

6.  They really want to eat      they’re          their            there           chili dogs anyway.

7.  The Lambert Stone Crushers’ Chess Club has       they’re     their        there          meet tomorrow;       they’re          their             there    going to walk all over the Humbolt Honeybees.

8.      They’re          Their          There         is every reason to believe            they’re            their            there           going to win         they’re             their               there          trophy back.

9.       Who’s      Whose           dog has been chewing my shoes?

10.      Who’s          Whose       the clown in the purple polka-dot suit?

 

Teachers, here are  the answers. The correct words are in bold.

1.      It’s      Its      not a secret.

2.     It’s      Its     easy to fall off this cliff because     it’s      its      trail runs too close to the edge.

3.     You’re        Your        not really going to eat that, are you?

4.     You’re        Your         stomach will revolt if you ride the Tilt-O-Wheel after eating three  chili dogs.

5.     You’re         Your        experience at the theme park will be better if         you’re         your         not sick on the rides.

6.  They really want to eat      they’re          their            there           chili dogs anyway.

7.  The Lambert Stone Crushers’ Chess Club has       they’re     their        there          meet tomorrow;       they’re          their             there    going to walk all over the Humbolt Honeybees.

8.      They’re          Their          There         is every reason to believe            they’re            their            there           going to win         they’re             their               there          trophy back.

9.       Who’s      Whose           dog has been chewing my shoes?

10.      Who’s          Whose       the clown in the purple polka-dot suit?

 

Would you like more grammar tutorials? Check these out:

How to use commas in compound sentences with coordinating conjunctions
How to punctuate dialog with Tarzan
How to use quotation marks and punctuation
How to use question marks and exclamation points with quotation marks
How to use gender-neutral writing
“Everyone” is singular
Indefinite pronouns and verbs The link to the tutorial is in the introduction.
Sorting out confusing words like “its” and “it’s”
23 fun grammar lessons in the eBook Let’s Eat Fifi

 

King Alfred's EnglishBefore I go, I want to let you know about a fascinating book I just read that makes history and the English language come alive. The book is King Alfred’s English: A History of the Language We Speak and Why We Should Be Glad We Do by Laurie J. White. In fact, I loved it so much that I wrote a review for it, which you can read here. It is amusing, engaging, full of interesting facts, and will fit into your Western history, British literature, or Bible classes. Take a peek at it and see what you think!

Yours for a more vibrant writing class,

Sharon Watson

 

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Copyright © 2014 by Sharon Watson
It’s Confusing infographic copyright © 2014 by Sharon Watson

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The Informer Fall 2014Do your students tell you they have ideas in their heads but can’t get them on paper? Click here to get help with that problem in my latest article “Writing: Let’s Make it Easier!” in The Informer. You’ll want to go to page 7.


 

compare guest blog

Would you like to know what the “C” word is and how horrible I was at it? Click here to read my guest post on Marcy Crabtree’s benandme.com.

ultimatehomeschoolradiohnetwork

Moms, could you use a little encouragement at the beginning of your hectic school year? Go to ultimatehomeschoolradionetwork.com titled “It’s All About Ewe”! Because it’s all about YOU!


Want daily writing prompts to tempt reluctant writers and delight eager ones? Find out more about Sharon’s daily writing prompts posted on SchoolhouseTeachers.com under “Dailies” or click here.


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the-power-in-your-hands writing-fiction-in-high-school Check out the innovative The Power in Your Hands: Writing Nonfiction in High School for your complete high school writing curriculum needs. If you have a storyteller at home, try Writing Fiction [in High School] with hundreds of examples from popular fiction and classical literature.